During a solar eclipse at some point on the Earth, on the very horizon, the disk of the Sun is visible with little damage

During a solar eclipse at some point on the Earth, on the very horizon, the disk of the Sun is visible with little damage from just below. Is it possible to observe a total solar eclipse at this point?

If the Sun is on the horizon, then it has either just risen, or will soon set, or, if it happens in polar latitudes, it moves along the horizon. If the Sun rises, then the Moon rises after him, already descending from the solar disk. If the Sun is nearing sunset, then the Moon, on the contrary, only enters the Sun’s disk. In both cases, a total eclipse, even if it happens on Earth, will not be visible at this point. Finally, if it happens in polar latitudes, a total solar eclipse also cannot occur, since in this latitudinal strip the Moon cannot move along the solar disk in a vertical direction.

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