It is known from mechanics that a body thrown horizontally at a low speed near the Earth’s surface moves along a parabola.

It is known from mechanics that a body thrown horizontally at a low speed near the Earth’s surface moves along a parabola. Does it mean that this speed is equal to the second cosmic speed? Is there a contradiction here with Kepler’s first law?

In problems in physics, the gravitational field near the Earth’s surface is assumed to be uniform, and in this case the body’s trajectory will indeed be a parabola. In the central field, which is the Earth’s gravitational field, a body thrown at a lower circular speed will move along an ellipse in accordance with Kepler’s first law. With a small throwing height (up to hundreds of meters), there will be no differences in both trajectories on the realizable section of the trajectory.

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