On December 30, 2001, on the same day, there was a penumbral lunar eclipse and the covering of Jupiter by the Moon

On December 30, 2001, on the same day, there was a penumbral lunar eclipse and the covering of Jupiter by the Moon, and the second of these phenomena was visible only on the island of Greenland and in the adjacent waters. What time of day was it observed there? Where were the Moon and Jupiter in the sky at that time?

Once a lunar eclipse occurred on December 30, 2001, it means that there was a full moon on that day, and the Moon, as well as Jupiter, were in the region of the sky opposite to the Sun. Given the date (end of December), we can conclude that they were in the constellation Gemini, near the point of the summer solstice, significantly north of the celestial equator.
Further, we know that the field of view of the covering of Jupiter by the Moon was very small and was located in the northern polar latitudes. From this we conclude that the coverage visibility cone barely touched the Earth from the north side.Considering the location of the Earth’s axis of rotation, we find that the Moon’s coverage of Jupiter occurred on Greenland near local noon, although the Sun did not rise above the horizon, and the full Moon, on the contrary, did not went behind him, as in these areas there was a polar night. The Moon and Jupiter were low above the northern horizon, and Jupiter went beyond the lower edge of the Moon’s disk.

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