The body of animals living in cold climates, such as fish in the Arctic seas, usually contains more unsaturated fats than the inhabitants

The body of animals living in cold climates, such as fish in the Arctic seas, usually contains more unsaturated fats than the inhabitants of southern latitudes. How can this be explained? What properties of unsaturated fats is this related to? What is the content of such fats for the body?

Fats with short and unsaturated acid chains have a low melting point. At room temperature, these are liquids (oils) or oily substances (fats). Conversely, fats with long and saturated chains of higher carboxylic acids become solid at room temperature. Here. why when hydrogenating (saturation of acid chains with hydrogen atoms in double bonds), liquid peanut butter, for example, becomes ointment-like, and sunflower oil turns into solid margarine. Compared to the inhabitants of southern latitudes, the body of animals living in cold climates (for example, in fish of the Arctic seas) usually contains more unsaturated triacylglycerols. For this reason, their body remains flexible even at low temperatures.

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