The planet revolves in a circular orbit around a star with constant luminosity. At some point on the planet’s surface

The planet revolves in a circular orbit around a star with constant luminosity. At some point on the planet’s surface, a paradoxical situation is observed – in the cold season of the year, the duration of daylight hours is much longer than in the warm! Could this be, and if so, at what point on the planet and under what conditions?

Oddly enough, this can be! Moreover, such a situation is practically realized on one of the planets of the solar system, on Uranus, whose axis of rotation forms a very small angle with the orbital plane. Imagine yourself at the equator of a planet where the apparent path of the central star among the stars (analogous to the ecliptic) passes through the local poles. Then twice a year, during the equinoxes, the local Sun will culminate at the zenith, and this will be the warmest time in your point of the planet, although the day will be exactly equal to the night. And during the solstices, the daylight will constantly be on the northern or southern horizon. It will be light all the time, but it will be the two coldest seasons of the year.

Remember: The process of learning a person lasts a lifetime. The value of the same knowledge for different people may be different, it is determined by their individual characteristics and needs. Therefore, knowledge is always needed at any age and position.