Zodiacal light is a faint glow of the night sky extending away from the Sun along the ecliptic, which is created by dust

Zodiacal light is a faint glow of the night sky extending away from the Sun along the ecliptic, which is created by dust in interplanetary space. What time of the year do you think is best to observe this phenomenon at our latitudes and why?

Since the zodiacal light is a weak glow and extends in the direction from the Sun along the ecliptic, it is best observed when the ecliptic crosses the horizon at a maximum angle – then the influence of absorption of light along the horizon, haze, etc. is less affected. If we turn to the map of the starry sky (Figure 6 of the problem), then we can guess that this happens during periods when the Sun is near the equinox points, i.e. in autumn in the morning in the eastern side of the horizon or in spring in the evening in the western side of the horizon, when before the beginning or after the end of astronomical twilight, respectively, a part of the ecliptic with positive declination rises above the horizon. Answer: in spring and autumn.

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